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Algae in Marlborough

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Algae are a diverse group of photosynthetic organisms that are usually found in aquatic environments. Not to be confused with blue-green algae, which are photosynthetic, but more closely related to bacteria, algae range from giant kelp to unicellular phytoplankton. Green, brown, and red algae are some of the different major groups, with many of the larger marine algae more commonly known as seaweed. Although algae are sometimes referred to as plants, unlike plants, they produce sperm and eggs, and require water for fertilisation.

On land, some algae form a symbiotic relationship with fungi in the form of lichens, which are capable of colonising some of the harshest environments on earth.

In Marlborough, algae can be found from the coast to some of the region's highest mountains in various forms. A few introduced species like didymo are invasive pests.

Kelp is farmed commercially in Tory Channel.

Codium convolutum

Codium convolutum

Codium convolutum is a green algae (seaweed) found throughout New Zealand growing on rocks in the intertidal zone.

Common Flapjack (Carpophyllum maschalocarpum)

Common Flapjack (Carpophyllum maschalocarpum)

Common Flapjack (Carpophyllum maschalocarpum) is a large marine brown algae (seaweed) endemic to New Zealand.

Neptune's necklace (Hormosira banksii)

Neptune's necklace (Hormosira banksii)

Neptune's necklace (Hormosira banksii) is a common brown algae with bead like structures found around the low tide mark particularly on rocky coastlines.

Bladder Kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera)

Bladder Kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera)

Bladder kelp is an algae found around southern New Zealand coasts, with distinctive gas filled bladders.

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