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The First Hundred - 1889

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Last Modified: 17-1-2023 13:04

Mayor: Mr G. W. Riley

Councillors: Messrs J. B. Green, W. B. Parker, G. Houldsworth, H. Jellyman, C. Tunnicliffe, C. Patchett, E. Bythell, R. McArtney, J. J. Sinclair, W. Ching, T. Smale, S. Norgrove.

JANUARY

The Marlborough Lawn Tennis Club erects a windmill to supply water for the courts in Poynter Street.

The Union Company's s.s. Kanieri is stopped by the Police from taking on coal on a Sunday after complaints from several people in Blenheim.

A dispute in the Borough streets between three men regarding the ownership of a swarm of bees. The first man, on whom the swarm alighted, claimed ownership. The second man, from whose hive the bees had swarmed, claimed them, and a third person who had seen and followed the swarm said he was the rightful owner. There was no report of the outcome.

FEBRUARY

Mr George Blackburn sends Council a bill of 10/- for burying a dead dog. Council refuses to pay it. At the next meeting, after much correspondence, Council calls for a report from the Inspector of Nuisances.

A public meeting is called for those interested in baseball.

MARCH

Bystanders are astonished at the "unwonted sweetness of sound" which emanated from The Express editorial sanctum when the Garrison Band sergeant played an obligato on the new band euphonium for members of the staff.

APRIL

9: The Government Building (Post Office) is transferred to the control of the Defence Department so that local government meetings could be made to close at 10 pm. This change  en- abled members of the Blenheim Rifles to expel, at bayonet point if necessary, any board or council that refused to leave.

MAY

Council requests Mr H. Dodson, Member for Marlborough, to petition Government to declare the racecourse reserve, also known as Omaka Domain, a reserve vested in the Borough Council.

The Borough's bank overdraft is £1657.

JUNE

8: Blenheim Schools close for three weeks on account of diphtheria.

Council threatens to cancel any public hall licence if any glove fight or pugilistic encounter takes place on the premises.

JULY

1: The foundations are laid for the new Blenheim School.

Messrs Brewer and Hay are commissioned to build a Masonic Lodge, Wairau S.C., in Andrew Street off High Street.

AUGUST

1: The Presbyterian Church proposes to build a new church at a cost of £1500 (the building vacated in 1968).

19: A half holiday is proclaimed on account of a Hawke's Bay versus Marlborough rugby game. Marlborough won 4 to nil.

SEPTEMBER

1: Notice in The Express: "A team of 15 grocers hereby chal­lenges 15 drapers to a game of football."

Council refuses an offer to light the Borough with electricity.

Mr F. Hale requests Council to erect a band rotunda around the fire hydrant in Market Place.

OCTOBER

The Workingmen's Club in High Street is denied permission to make Club additions.

The Marlborough Club wants to run drainage into a ditch in High Street. It is referred to Government.

NOVEMBER

7: Representations are made to the authorities regarding a public servant who took two weeks' holiday, the first in 14 years, and subsequently had his pay stopped for the period.

Six-pound tins of mutton produced by the Boga Rabbit and Meat Preserving Co., St. Andrews, fetch the handsome price of 5 1/4 d per lb on the London Market.

DECEMBER

The Band Rotunda in Market Place is erected. Councillors are glum because the estimated cost is between £40 and £50.

Rates 9 1/2d in £ plus 1 1/4d Hospital rate; rates produce £829; rateable value, £26,279; estimates £2232.

Cite this page

Beverley, A. (2023). The First Hundred - 1889. Retrieved February, 28, 2024, from https://www.marlboroughonline.co.nz/marlborough/information/history/the-first-hundred/1889

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